What Makes a Story Worth Telling?

by Kathleen Weber

“Did it make you laugh? Or make you cry? Did you think that you were going to die?
“Were you so scared that your skin crawled? Did you fly real high?
“Did you stumble? Fall? Did it spiritually touch or humble you?
“Were you left wondering – I am who?
“When heart and mind and soul collide, it’s time to put your life aside.
“And like your third grade teacher taught, put pen in hand and share your thought.”

Kathleen is one of eight In Print members to have her work featured at the Allegory Project, an art space and exhibition co-sponsored by the Art Matters Artist Coop and the Rockford Area Arts Council. The Allegory Project plans to have a theme that is explored in various art forms: painting and sculpture, photography, repurposed objects, and the spoken and written word.

Kathleen’s piece and the others have been framed at the gallery and are available for viewing from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday through the end of May. The show space is on the northwest corner of Madison and Prairie Streets in Rockford

The Poem Undone

By Bob Francis, originally posted on The Bob Files.

It has been my experience the best poetry I’ve written is linked to strong emotional states: love, melancholy, sadness, birth, death.  Those episodes brought forth poems almost complete, directly from my head to paper.

My mom’s dad died when I was eighteen years old.  It was the first close death I had ever experienced.  A couple of years later, I had an assignment in one of my rhetoric classes: write a poem using only concrete images.  Grandpa came out in a single sitting.  All I had to do was put it in some kind of form and correct the spelling.

And when my brother was killed, I expected some kind of poetic epiphany.  I had to write a eulogy, after all.  I did write a eulogy, but it was just a long essay; almost a proto-blog.  No poem came to me.  In fact no words came to me for a long time after that.

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In Print Radio – Episode 31

Elizabeth Wheeler, Lolita Ditzler

Elizabeth Wheeler, Lolita Ditzler

Lolita Ditzler talks with young adult author Elizabeth Wheeler.

Alice Refvik reads her poem, Onion Tears.

Sandi Adams interviews romance writer Beverly Long.


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Come See In Print Radio – Live!

Jim Proebstle

Jim Proebstle

In Print Radio will be recording an episode live in front of an audience.  You are invited to attend!

Sandy Colbert will talk with award winning writer Jim Proebstle, author of Fatal Incident.  The show will feature a reading and an interview, which will include the opportunity for the audience to ask questions too.

The interview will be at the Barnes and Noble bookstore at Cherry Vale Mall on Saturday, April 19, starting at 1:00 pm.  See you there!

In Print Radio plans to record other shows in the area in front of an audience.  Sign up to receive information on upcoming show guests, dates and locations.  Dates and times will also be posted on this website and the In Print Facebook and Twitter pages.

Freedom Fighter

by Mary Lamphere

“The summer I was nine years old, I stopped wearing dresses, tucked my long ponytail up into my baseball cap and asked people to call me Mark. I said things like, “This sucks!” and “Crud!” and “Shut up!” And I spit. That’s right, I spit. I wasn’t very good at it, nothing by air loogies, but I tried, and trying was enough o get me in trouble. That was the summer I saw the movie, The Bad News Bears. It was also the summer my mother died. The year was 1976 and the entire nation was rejoicing in their independence. Except me.”

Mary is one of eight In Print members to have her work featured at the Allegory Project, an art space and exhibition co-sponsored by the Art Matters Artist Coop and the Rockford Area Arts Council. The Allegory Project plans to have a theme that is explored in various art forms: painting and sculpture, photography, repurposed objects, and the spoken and written word. The current theme answers the question, “What makes a story worth telling?”

Mary’s piece and the others have been framed at the gallery and are available for viewing from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday through the end of May. The show space is on the northwest corner of Madison and Prairie Streets in Rockford

In Print Radio – Episode 30

Tim Chapman and Sandy Colbert

Tim Chapman and Sandy Colbert

Sandy Colbert talks with author and former forensic scientist Tim Chapman.  The show was recorded in front of an audience at Barnes and Noble in Cherry Valley, Illinois, on March 22.

Wish you had been part of the fun?  In Print Radio plans to record more shows with an audience in the near future.  Sign up to receive information on upcoming show guests, dates and locations.  Dates and times will also be posted on this website and the In Print Facebook and Twitter pages.


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Christopher Sims to be Featured on In Print Radio

Richard Pulfer and Christopher Sims

Richard Pulfer and Christopher Sims

In Print member Richard Pulfer sat down with spoken word artist Christopher Sims at the Cherry Valley District Library. They talked about Christopher’s poetry and his performances around the world. He also performed several of his poems. The poems and their conversation will be featured on future episodes of In Print Radio.

A Story Worth Telling

by Caryl Barnes

“Ada Fell took several deep breaths and surrounded herself with light. With her psychological and spiritual boundaries protected, Ada’s thoughts turned to Ben Martin. Recently dead, he had signaled Ada for help two weeks earlier in a Sarasota cemetery. Ada, who often performed services for the departed, was clairvoyant. With her inner vision, she saw that Ben was not ready to cross over from the earth plane to the Light. First he had to correct an injustice.

“Ben asked Ada to locate Todd, his estranged son. She must give Todd a bundle of letters in Ben’s office safe. Ben and Janice, his first wife, wrote the letters during the Korean War while they were still very much in love. Because the marriage had ended badly forty years ago when Todd, their only child, was a baby, Ben never told his son that Opal, his second wife, wasn’t his birth mother. As a teenager Todd learned of the truth from a neighbor and demanded information. Ben refused to talk about the past, and Todd left home in a fury. Now in his grave, Ben felt that the letters properly belonged to Todd. They were literally letters of introduction to his mother!

“Ada had not yet found Todd. Where had he been all these years? Had he changed his name? Had he found his birth mother? Could she still be alive? Ada was forever asking herself questions to which she might never know the answers. That’s just as well, she told herself, since I’m almost as interested in the questions as answers.

“She remembered the story about Gertrude Stein. “What’s the answer?” Stein asked on her death bed. Her partner, Alice B. Toklas, and the friends gathered around her were silent. “Then, what is the question?” Stein inquired and died.”

Caryl is one of eight In Print members to have her work featured at the Allegory Project, an art space and exhibition co-sponsored by the Art Matters Artist Coop and the Rockford Area Arts Council. The Allegory Project plans to have a theme that is explored in various art forms: painting and sculpture, photography, repurposed objects, and the spoken and written word. The current theme answers the question, “What makes a story worth telling?”

Caryl’s piece and the others have been framed at the gallery and are available for viewing starting Friday, April 11 from 4:00 pm – 10:00 pm and Saturday, April 12 from 3:00 pm – 10:00 pm. After that, they will be open from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday through the end of May. The show space is on the northwest corner of Madison and Prairie Streets in Rockford

Welcome to the Club

Originally posted on Mary Lamphere:

Coming off a whirlwind weekend in Madison at the 25th annual Writers’ Institute , I am overwhelmed, exhausted and really really excited about the now and future of publishing.

The four day event covered much more than I could possibly summarize in a single Monday Blog. The Institute offers sessions for every level, every genre, and every interest of writers. It is hosted by agents, editors, managers, publishers, and professionals that should be beyond my piddly reach and yet, there they are– willing to talk to, teach, share, entertain and mentor. It is an incredible affair.
But enough gushing.

Parting Gifts was the closing panel– “3 things every writer should seriously think about doing the minute they walk out of the conference.” Three of their recommendations:
1. Digest
2. Be thankful
3. Continue contact

Lists of 3 should help me cover a lot of ground without being overwhelming or exhausting, but…

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